Big eye, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 The Henry C. Daryaw

Canada, Ontario

Altri posti:

Questa è una mappa interattiva! usa i controlli zoom e pan.

Datum: WGS84 [ Aiuto ]
Precisione: Approssimato

Cronologia GPS (1)

Latitudine: 44° 31.59' N
Longitudine: 75° 45.814' W

Giudizio dell'utente (0)


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 Accesso

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano): By boat: The wreck is marked with a buoy.

Come? In barca

Distanza Buona navigazione (< 30min)

Facile da trovare? Facile da trovare

 Caratteristiche del sito d'immersione

Profondità media 24.4 m / 80.1 ft

profondità massima 27.4 m / 89.9 ft

Corrente Forte ( > 2 nodi)

Visibilità Buona ( 10 - 30 m)

Qualità

Qualità del sito d'immersione Grande

Esperienza CMAS ** / AOW

Interesse biologico Scarso

Più dettagli

Frequentazione durante la settimana 

Frequentazione durante il Week-end 

Tipo di immersione

- Acqua dolce
- In corrente
- Relitto
- Profonda

Attività per il sito

- Notturna
- Allenamento
- Orientamento

Pericoli

- Profondità
- Corrente

 Altre informazioni

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

English (Traduci questo testo in Italiano):  STRONG CURRENT throughout this dive.

The Darya is a 219 ft steel freighter that struck a nearby shoal on November 20th, 1941, carrying a load of coal, which is found in relative abundance nearby. The gash she suffered was too great and down she went with the loss of one crew member. She landed on the bottom inverted with bow upstream and is literally against a canyon wall to starboard with a mere ten feet separating them in spots.
Hand over hand it down the line to the props to save your legs for later or, if you're with an experienced charter skipper you can drift onto the wreck from upstream.
If you drift it and want easy recovery, grab the line at the props and make your way to the surface marker.
If you take the line descent, once at the props, you have two choices. Head left down a secondary line and move to the cargo area and duck under and in to have a rest and explore this vast space. Check out the gash that sank her and if you're properly wreck trained, penetration here can be rewarding. The options are towards the bow, there is a hatch to get into the bow spaces ( well lit by port holes) but depending on your size, you may need to doff your gear to squeeze through. The other place to gain entry is via a doorway with inverted stairs, at the aft end of the cargo space, starboard side. Tie your line off on the stairs. You can turn right, go a short distance and then jog left to an electrical room or duck down a deck and emerge between machinery on the starboard side of the wreck. Alternatively, if you're not a mud puppy, you can instead go straight ahead from the doorway and down a corridor that's about 5 feet high and 40 or so feet long. At the end, drop down a stairwell and either exit under the stern ( very low here) or continue down the stairwell to the engine room. CAUTION: Even the best divers will stir something up here. It WILL silt out on you so get your look at the machinery while you can and never lose touch with your line. This wreck has claimed at least one VERY experienced diver in this area of the ship.
Heading outside the wreck from the cargo bay and closest to the bow, swim, grab/haul to the bow and spiderman up to the top (bottom :))and get ready for the flying experience of your life. The current will whisk you almost dead centre down the hull. Grab the prop line or duck under the stern at the end. Personally, I'm usually too pooped to duck under as it will require some effort.
If you chose to explore under the stern ( in the lee) from your descent from the props, there is a hatchway leading up and into the corridor and stairwell I mentioned earlier.
The fish here almost always tend to be Walleye and are in abundance between the wreck and the canyon wall.

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 Dive logs

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tadion avatar
The Henry C. Daryaw
By tadion
Sep 5, 2010
The Henry C. Daryaw - A great dive.  Strong current.
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tadion avatar
Trip: St Lawrence
By tadion
From Sep 3, 2010 to Sep 5, 2010
Lisetta organized the dive through Waterfront Diving Center.
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